Tennis elbow

racquetball, racquet sports, tennis, butcher, painter, contractor, repetitive stress, injury, tendinitis, pain, swelling, RICE

 

Tennis Elbow

The medical term for tennis elbow is lateral epicondylitis. It is a painful repetitive stress condition that is from an inflammation of the tendons in the forearm muscles that connect on the outside of the elbow. Overuse will damage the tendons and result in inflammation.

 

The overuse of the elbow can be triggered by several different activities. These activities will include tennis and other racquet sports but are not limited to athletic pursuits. Any activity in which you repetitively use your elbow joint will also trigger the injury, such as painters, plumbers, carpenters and butchers.

You’ll experience the pain on the outside of the elbow during the activity that triggered the injury and the http://2093bfz4tm2vcv0vmbw8ge7ydc.hop.clickbank.net/can spread through the forearm and down to the wrist. Other activities that use the same motion will also trigger pain, such as turning a door handle, holding a coffee cup or shaking hands.

 

Your doctor will likely diagnose the problem through history and physical examination. How your symptoms developed, your history of activity and your current symptoms will all be included. You may be asked to get an x-ray to rule out arthritis, MRI to determine if the pain is not originating from a spinal problem in the neck or an EMG to rule out nerve compression – all of which are treated differently than tennis elbow.

 

The treatment is primarily rest, physical therapy and bracing. According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, approximately 80% of people with tennis elbow will recover with nonsurgical treatments.

 

Your physician may also recommend non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications to reduce the pain and to reduce the swelling in the are. If you prefer to reduce the amount of medication you can ice the area for 10 minutes 5-7 times per day. Using a brace over the back of the forearm will also help to support the area and reduce symptoms because it will rest the tendons and muscles.

 

However, just because your symptoms are subsiding with the ice and bracing does not mean you should return to your activities. Instead, keep resting the area and do physical therapy exercises to strengthen and stretch the muscles of the forearm. This will help to reduce the potential that the injury will recur.

 

Resources

 

 

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons: Tennis Elbow
http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00068

MedlinePlus: Tennis Elbow
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000449.htm

MayoClinic: Tennis Elbow
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tennis-elbow/basics/definition/con-20043041

Southern California Orthopedic: Tennis Elbow
http://www.scoi.com/tennis-elbow.php

Sports Injury Clinic: Tennis Elbow
http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/sport-injuries/elbow-pain/tennis-elbow

American College of Sports medicine: Tennis Elbow
http://www.acsm.org/docs/current-comments/tenniselbow.pdf

Emory HealthCare: Epicondylitis
http://www.emoryhealthcare.org/orthopedic-hand-upper-extremity/conditions/epicondylitis.html

Areas Of One’s Game That Are Critical In Tennis

As tennis continues to grow its fans and players will always be arguing on what determines a good player and which skills are the most important to have.

There are arguments that can be made for a handful of different elements of the sport, and while it may all boil down to a matter of opinion, it’s still fun to look at the possibilities.

Here are the most important factors. Let’s see which one you think matters most.

What about volleying?

A game that it going too smoothly can become a disadvantage for opponents as points may easily be lost. Just take a look back at players of the past such as John McEnroe.

What about baseline play, is that important?

Many experts would say that it is the more modern approach as opposed to playing at the net. Take Rafael Nadal for example, he spends a lot of time hanging at the back of the court rather that up at the net. And other players such as Andy Roddick have changed tactics in favour of the baseline play.

Any player with a powerful serve can easily take control of the court if their opponent is unable to break them and this will give them an overall advantage.

Take Roddick as a good example of a big serve.

How about speed though?

Guys like Nadal can get to just about every ball, making it extremely difficult for their opponents to win points. The harder your opposition has to work for a point, the more unforced errors you’ll ultimately cause.

I think that the x-factor wins over all others.nadal

Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer have a mental attitude that goes with winning. The type of ‘no lose’ attitude which, I think gives them an edge over their opponents.

You will hardly ever see either of these two stars become flustered or overexcited. They have the mental focus to remain composed throughout the game.

 

The Tennis Serve

In terms of the rules of tennis, the serve is a shot which has one function – to start a point by putting the ball in play. It is simply intended to commence a rally, all things being equal, but in recent times it has become a whole lot more important than that. These days, a particularly good serve can win you matches almost on its own – although players who can serve and do little else are still unlikely to win many titles.

 

Because of the way it is played – the ball is almost always struck overarm, from a ball thrown into the air by the player whose turn it is to serve – it tends to be the fastest shot played in any rally. A player with a particularly fast serve, or one who has pinpoint accuracy, can win points without their opponent even getting a racket to the ball. When a serve wins a point without being touched by the opponent, it is referred to as an “ace”.

 

Some of the greatest exponents of the serve have been the Croatian Goran Ivanisevic, Britain’s Greg Rusedski and the man with the three fastest serves recorded in men’s tennis, Andy Roddick, who holds the world record with a service of 155mph. The fastest women’s serve ever recorded came from Brenda Schulz McCarthy, who hit one of 130mph in 2006. there are many people who view the growing speed of tennis serves as detrimental to the game, as it prevents long rallies – but others who view it as an awesome display of raw power.

 

How can I take my tennis to the next level………..?

I’m only intermediate at the moment but want to get seriously hot at tennis. Im pretty inconsistent but I want to really improve so I have been using the ball machine a fair amount. The problem is my club is pretty dead most of the time so there arent a lot of people to play with. What do you think the best way to get awesome is? I cant really afford many tennis lessons at the moment.
Im 23 so quite old but do you think I should try and get into some adult tournaments or something? thanks

Fitness+tennis question below?

I might be playing varsity tennis all through high school and I might continue tennis for a long time. I love the sport!

However, I don’t know what it’ll do for my body, along with I might play soccer for 2-3 years. I’m a girl, and I don’t want a big manly body! I just want to be toned and slim.

I have a small-medium frame/natural size.
I’m 15.

What and how should I eat, to reach and maintain this goal, so I’ll be nicely toned, instead of looking big and muscular?

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